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Call relay protocol logo

DIY Spy Program: Abusing Apple’s Call Relay Protocol

Introduction

Apple introduced a new set of features in iOS 8 and Yosemite under the name “Continuity”. These features allow iPhones to work with other iDevices such as Macs and iPads in new ways. Handoff, Instant hotspot and Airdrop are some of the new services offered by Continuity. Among these new services is one named “Call Relay”. Essentially, it allows one to make and receive phone calls via iDevices and route them through the iPhone. This is not your typical VOIP service as it’s a P2P connection based on a proprietary protocol.

In order for it to work, both devices (iPhone and the iDevice that makes/takes the call) need to be on the same WiFi. This is what caught my attention. Apple’s security white-paper is short and vague on this particular topic. Only four paragraphs are dedicated to explain how Call Relay works and the only security relevant information is as follows: “The audio will be seamlessly transmitted from your iPhone using a secure peer-to-peer connection between the two devices.”

How it works

The first step is to get a high level understanding of the protocol and how the different actors interact. Wireshark is our friend here. For easy reading, we will take the case of an incoming call from now on. That is, somebody calls the victim, his iPhone rings but he picks up the call on his MacBook.

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Lastpass and Google Authenticator

Design flaws in Lastpass 2FA implementation

As part of a Red Team engagement I found myself looking for a way to bypass two-factor authentication (2FA) in Lastpass. Unfortunately this happened before Tavis Ormandy reported multiple 0-days in Lastpass. Would have saved us so much time! Anyway, 2FA is an additional layer of security to protect user accounts from attackers that have already compromised your password. I mention this because it is key to understand the purpose of this post.

When you login into a service using your username and password, you will get an additional challenge before access is granted. Usually it is a 6 digit temporary code that changes every 30 seconds. Google authenticator, Authy and Toopher are just a few of the 2FA solutions Lastpass supports that are based on RFC6238 and RFC4226. There are other types of 2FA but these are the most common.

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Venmo post logo

How to steal $2,999.99 in less than 2 minutes with Venmo and Siri

Venmo is a very popular mobile app which simplifies payments among friends. Once you link your bank account or credit card, you can start sending money to others, instantly.

With Venmo, you are not limited to just make payments. It allows you to charge others as well. Say your friend had no cash for that tasty burrito and you paid for it. You have the option to be proactive and “charge” your friend using Venmo. Charging someone does not mean that the money will be withdraw from his account, it just means that he will get a notification and see the pending payment in his account. Your friend has to accept the charge in order for the payment to happen. And this functionality is what we are going to take advantage of.

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Breaking LastPass vaults logo

Even the LastPass Will be Stolen, Deal with It!

I am back from Amsterdam after presenting our research at Blackhat “Even the LastPass Will be Stolen, Deal with It!” together with Alberto Garcia. We had a blast at the conference and we got great feedback from the audience. Many asked for the video, slides, etc. so I though it was worth writing a post with all the details of our talk.

Motivation

During one of Alberto’s red team pentests, he gained access to several machines and found that all of them had files with references to LastPass. He came to me and told me it would be cool to check how LastPass works and if it was possible to steal LastPass credentials. 10% of our time is for research so we made that our small project.

We found how creds where stored locally and wrote a Metasploit plugin so he could use it to extract vault contents from all the compromised machines. Thanks to the module, he was able to obtain SSH keys to critical servers and the pentest was a success.

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About today’s LastPass breach

Today, LastPass issued a security notice on their blog explaining that they detected some suspicious activity on their network. They believe that “LastPass account email addresses, password reminders, server per user salts, and authentication hashes were compromised” but also that the encrypted passwords (the vault) was not accessed.

What does all this really mean? I found the security notice a little vague and I thought that it is worth writing a post about what the breach exactly means and what the attackers can do with the stolen data. Read more

A look into LastPass

As part of the time that my company offers for research, my good friend and talented hacker Alberto Illera (@algillera) and me decided to “checkout” LastPass.

Many of you may already know (or even use) LastPass. It is a pretty well known password manager that stores all your passwords in a “vault” and keeps them secure. Additionally, it can automatically populate the credentials for you when you visit a website in which your are registered making it easy to use more secure, random and unique passwords. You will just have to remember the master password that decrypts the vault and that’s all.

LastPass comes in many forms. As a browser plugin, as a mobile app or even as webapp.

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Google and usernames, emails and URLs harvesting

Google Apps for business is a set of Google services for companies including email,

nonexisting email
nonexisting email

online storage, calendars, etc. This allows companies to avoid the hassle of having to manage all these services in house and simply outsource it. One of those services is email. A company can have their personal email domain but still working under the gmail platform.

valid emails
valid emails

I realized that when I enter a valid email address from a company using Google Apps, the response code is 302 with the location header containing an internal url. As you may know, 302 is used to indicate

the browser that the resource is in a different place, specifically where the location header points to. Read more

Flywheel, Free rides and credit cards

After looking at Lyft, it was turn to check out Flywheel. Flywheel is yet another app to help you find cabs just as Uber does. During my pentest I found several serious security problems.

Ride and get paid!

Yep, just like it sounds. Flywheel lets you set a default tip that will be added to the total cost so you don’t have to bother about tipping the driver. The app gives you several options (15%, 20%, 25%). When we set a tip, the request looks like this: Read more

Lyft, fuzzing and Denial of Service attacks

As a regular user of apps like Lyft, Uber, Flywheel and anything that makes commuting more convenient, curiosity and free time lead me to open burp and start lurking around. I saw many interesting things but in this post I will focus only on the things related to the issue I found.

Validating coupons

Lyft offers the option to enter coupons to get credit for rides. This way they attract new customers and retain current ones. The request to validate such coupons looks like this: Read more